Gosport residents reject proposed condos

Belleville, ON, Canada / Quinte News

John Spitters

Jan 23, 2023 | 4:01 AM

Gosport residents reject proposed condos

Location of proposed condominiums in Brighton's Gosport community. (Photo: Brighton Planning agenda)


 

Residents of Brighton’s lakeshore Gosport neighbourhood plan to fight a proposal to build 32 condominium units in eight multi-storey buildings near a provincially significant wetland.

Over 200 people, mostly from Gosport, attended a recent Brighton council planning meeting to voice their objections to the plan.

Residents believe the condo construction will harm wildlife living in and near the wetlands and ruin what they believe are culturally significant Indigenous artifacts at the site on Elgin Street.

The Gosport Residents Association says it will appeal an approval of the project by Brighton Council to the Ontario Land Tribunal and have set up a Gofundme page to finance an appeal.

Council could decide the issue February 13.

Find more information from the Gosport Residents Association here.

Their Gofundme page can be found here.

 

Keeping an eye on housing plans

Belleville, ON, Canada / Quinte News

Mary Thomas

Jan 18, 2023 | 4:02 PM

Keeping an eye on housing plans


 

Hastings County is keeping its eye on Ontario’s recent announcement of more than a million new homes to be built in Ontario.

At a recent meeting of the county’s Planning and Development committee, Chief Administrative Officer Jim Pine said it’s not yet known how many of those new homes would be built in the county.

Pine adds, “But, the Eastern Ontario Wardens Caucus continues to make the point that eastern Ontario needs to be part of that construction effort.  That build effort.  In fact, they have a pretty significant proposal that was to be discussed at Rural Ontario Municipal Association (last) Sunday with a number of cabinet ministers around.”

“Community housing. We want to be a part of home ownership but also on the side of social or community housing, but we haven’t seen a specific number for eastern Ontario.”

Pine added that the Eastern Ontario Wardens Caucus continues to make the point that eastern Ontario needs to be part of that construction effort.

The provincial government has indicated recently that 1.5 million new homes will be built in Ontario.

 

Quinte’s Isle Campark dispute is over

Belleville, ON, Canada / Quinte News

Alan-Michael Steele

Jan 18, 2023 | 10:20 PM

Quinte's Isle Campark dispute is over

A year and a half long property dispute in Prince Edward County is coming to a close.

Prince Edward County planning committee has approved an agreement between the Friends of the South Shore and Quinte’s Isle Campark to resolve a dispute over planned expansions to the park.

The motion was approved without comment.

The motion is the latest step in resolving a dispute between the Friends of the South Shore and Prince Edward County, after the Friends of the South Shore appealed a previous approval of Quinte’s Isle Campark expansion to the Ontario Local Planning Appeal Tribunal.

Their objections focused on the environmental impact, as the expansion would take place near two provincially significant wetlands. Other issues raised included increased traffic and noise.

The agreed upon solution includes zoning changes that mandate setbacks from the protected wetlands along with special requirements for signage, implementation of natural flood proofing, more tree planting, and the establishment of wildlife corridors.

The revised zoning will be submitted to the Ontario Local Planning Appeal Tribunal for final approval.

 

Edmonton most development-friendly city, GTA worst: CHBA report – Real Estate News Exchange

 

Edmonton’s municipal processes for new construction are the most streamlined in Canada, while those in Toronto are the worst, according to CHBA’s 2022 Municipal Benchmarking Study. “The City of Edmonton is focusing on doing better in all of these areas and that’s where we need all municipalities to be,” Kevin Lee, CEO of the CHBA, told RENX. “Municipalities in the GTA really fare quite poorly, especially in approval timelines and government charges,” Lee said, adding taxes and development charges have risen an average of 700 per cent Canada-wide over the past 20 years. “Since our last study in 2020, we’ve seen government charges go up 25 per cent on low-rise and 29 per cent on high-rise construction. If you look at Toronto, the average government charges are up to $189,000 per unit.” He credits Toronto for having good planning features and an efficient electronic system, as well as making information pertaining to the planning processes easily available. “But being able to execute and get it through approval systems — and we’ve already talked about the exorbitantly high charges builders pay — that’s where it comes apart,” Lee said. He recommends as-of-right zoning as one way to shorten timelines, and noted that, irrespective of whether an application is for a small or tall building with more units, wait times are the same and much too long.

 

Commentary: CHBA’s 2022 Municipal Benchmarking Study examines how local development processes, approvals, and charges affect housing affordability and housing supply in major markets across Canada. This report is intended to support the important conversation with all levels of government, but particularly with municipal governments, on the efficient delivery of much needed new housing supply, including the impact that inefficiencies and taxes have on housing affordability, which is already a major challenge across the country. As CHBA CEO Kevin Lee states in the article, cities that didn’t fare so well in the 2022 rankings can see where other municipalities have ranked better and adopt some of those planning features. To read more on the report's findings, please visit chba.ca/MunicipalBenchmarking.

 

B.C. creating permit 'hub' to streamline housing approval process: premier – CBC News

 

The British Columbia government is creating a single hub for developers to get provincial approval for their projects in another step to tackle the housing shortage. Premier David Eby said that homebuilding authorizations in B.C. can require multiple provincial permit applications across separate ministries, each with different processes that can sometimes take up to two years for approval. He said the new strategy will streamline the process by creating a single, coordinated approach with the goal of cutting down the approval process to a few months. "Given our current situation, we cannot afford unnecessary delays that prevent new homes [that are] desperately needed from breaking ground,'' said Housing Minister Ravi Kahlon. He said about five per cent of the 21,000 permits currently in the provincial system are related to housing. "The new permanent strategy for housing is going to prioritize housing projects so we can get the housing we need built faster." Neil Moody, CEO for CHBA B.C., said the changes will address long-standing challenges to the industry posed by a complex provincial approval process. […]

 

Commentary: Last week, CHBA released its 2022 Municipal Benchmarking Study that examines how local development processes, approvals, and charges affect housing affordability and housing supply in major markets across the country. This report is intended to support the important conversation with all levels of government, but particularly with municipal governments, on the efficient delivery of much needed new housing supply, including the impact that inefficiencies and taxes have on housing affordability, which is already a major challenge across the country. CHBA has undertaken this work to showcase where municipal governments have the policies and systems in place to support supply and affordability, and to provide a path forward for improvements where things aren’t working as well. To read more on the report's findings, please visit chba.ca/MunicipalBenchmarking.

 

New home building in Canada slowed in December, CMHC reports – Global News

 

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. says the annual pace of housing starts in December slowed five per cent compared with November. The national housing agency says the seasonally adjusted annual rate of housing starts in December was 248,625 units compared with 263,022 in November. The drop came as the annual pace of urban starts fell five per cent to 227,708. The rate of multi-unit urban starts dropped four per cent to 182,850, while the pace of single-detached urban starts fell 11 per cent to 44,858. Rural starts were estimated at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 20,917 units for December. The six-month moving average of the monthly seasonally adjusted annual rates of housing starts was 269,930 in December, down one per cent from 273,801 in November.

 

Commentary: The stagnation in CMHC’s housing starts data is reflective of what CHBA’s Housing Market Index (HMI) already established was coming because of the impact of rising interest rates on the home building industry. The 2022 Q3 release of CHBA’s Housing Market Index (HMI) showed a further drop in builder confidence, indicating an even more severe slowing in future housing development activity is coming. Both the single-family (43.4/100) and multi-family (35.9/100) HMI indicators reached record lows in Q3 as a result of higher interest rates. Please stay tuned for the 2022 Q4 results which are upcoming. CHBA's HMI is a much-needed leading indicator about the current and future health of the residential construction industry in Canada. To find out more or to participate in the survey, please visit CHBA’s HMI webpage.

 

Investment in building construction, November 2022 – Statistics Canada

 

Investment in building construction declined 1.4% to $20.4 billion in November, with most of the drop coming from Alberta (-5.6%). The residential sector decreased 2.0% to $14.9 billion, while the non-residential sector edged up 0.2% to $5.5 billion. On a constant dollar basis (2012=100), investment in building construction decreased by 2.0% to $12.0 billion.

 

Commentary: Statistics Canada reported today that in November, Alberta (-7.1%) experienced its largest drop in residential investment since the COVID-19 downturn in April 2020. Investment in single-family homes continued to fall for the fourth consecutive month, down 3.9% to $7.8 billion in November, with all provinces reporting declines. This month's decline brought the single-family component back down to levels last seen in December 2021. Multi-unit family investment remained relatively unchanged, edging up 0.1% to $7.1 billion, despite notable gains from Manitoba (+16.4%) which helped offset declines in six provinces. CHBA continues to monitor these trends.

 

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